Unit Descriptions for VCE Studies

Contents

Unit Descriptions for VCE Studies

Accounting

Unit 1

This unit explores the establishment of a business and the role of accounting in the determination of business success or failure. In this, it considers the importance of accounting information to stakeholders. Students analyse, interpret and evaluate the performance of the business using financial and non-financial information. They use these evaluations to make recommendations regarding the suitability of a business as an investment.

Unit 2

In this unit students develop their knowledge of the accounting process for sole proprietors operating a trading business, with a focus on inventory, accounts receivable, accounts payable and non-current assets. Students use manual processes and ICT, including spreadsheets, to prepare historical and budgeted accounting reports.

Unit 3

This unit focuses on financial accounting for a trading business owned by a sole proprietor, and highlights the role of accounting as an information system. Students use the double entry system of recording financial data and prepare reports using the accrual basis of accounting and the perpetual method of inventory recording.

Unit 4

In this unit students further develop their understanding of accounting for a trading business owned by a sole proprietor and the role of accounting as an information system. Students use the double entry system of recording financial data and prepare reports using the accrual basis of accounting and the perpetual method of inventory recording. Both manual methods and ICT are used to record and report.

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Agriculture and Horticulture

Unit 1

In this unit students develop their understanding of Australia’s agricultural and horticultural industries and research the opportunities and practical realities of working in the sector. They consider sources of food and fibre indigenous to Victoria prior to European settlement. Students explore contemporary career pathways and professional roles. Students undertake practical tasks reflecting best-practice understandings.

Unit 2

In this unit students research plant and animal nutrition, growth and reproduction. They evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of agricultural or horticultural practices. Students research reproductive processes and technologies for both plants and animals within the contexts of food and fibre production. They undertake practical tasks relating to the growth and management of plants and animals.

Unit 3

In this unit students examine the role of research and data, innovation and technology in Australia’s food and fibre industries. They explore the influence of market demands and social expectations as drivers of change. Emphasis is placed on the importance of biosecurity: the protection of agricultural and horticultural industries against pests, diseases and weeds, and measures to combat the serious threat posed by biological resistances. Students undertake practical tasks reflecting awareness of innovative, sustainable and safe agricultural and/or horticultural practices.

Unit 4

In this unit students examine sustainability. Students research the effects of climate change on food and fibre production. They investigate environmental degradation and approaches to sustainable land management and rehabilitation. Students research strategies for securing sustainable markets, for adding value to primary produce, and for ensuring and promoting the high quality of Australian-grown products. They undertake practical tasks reflecting all dimensions of sustainable management of agricultural and/or horticultural practices as well as ethical considerations.

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Algorithmics (Higher Education Study)

Unit 3

Algorithmics is fundamental to computer science and software engineering and is essential for understanding the technical underpinnings of the information society. Beyond its use in computing, algorithmics provides a general discipline of rational thought by virtue of the methodical way it approaches problem solving. VCE Algorithmics (HESS - Higher Education Scored Study) examines how information about the world can be systematically represented and how the processes can be made sufficiently explicit and precise so they can be implemented in a computer program. The focus is not on coding but on ‘algorithmic thinking’. For Unit 3, the students look at algorithmic problem solving through data modelling with abstract data types, algorithm design, and applied algorithms. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework) and the VCAA examinations.

Unit 4

For Unit 4 in VCE Algorithmics (HESS - Higher Education Scored Study), the students look at the principles of algorithmics through formal algorithm analysis, advanced algorithm design and the universality of computation and algorithms. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework) and the VCAA examinations.

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Applied Computing

Unit 1

In this unit students are introduced to the stages of the problem-solving methodology. Students focus on how data can be used within software tools such as databases and spreadsheets to create data visualisations and the use of programming languages to develop working software solutions.

Unit 2

Students work collaboratively and select a topic for further study to create an innovative solution in an area of interest. The innovative solution can be presented as a proof of concept, a prototype or a product. Students also propose strategies for reducing security risks to data and information in a networked environment

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Applied Computing: Data Analytics

Unit 3

Students access, select and extract authentic data from large repositories. They manipulate the data to present findings as data visualisations in response to teacher-provided solution requirements and designs. Students develop software solutions using database, spreadsheet and data visualisation software tools to undertake the problem-solving activities in the development stages of manipulation, validation and testing.

Unit 4

In this unit students focus on determining the findings of a research question by developing infographics or dynamic data visualisations based on large complex data sets and on the security strategies used by an organisation to protect data and information from threats.

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Applied Computing: Software Development

Unit 3

In this unit students apply the problem-solving methodology to develop working software modules using a programming language. Students develop an understanding of the analysis, design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology.

Unit 4

In this unit students focus on how the information needs of individuals and organisations are met through the creation of software solutions. They consider the risks to software and data during the software development process, as well as throughout the use of the software solution by an organisation.

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Art

Unit 1

Students apply the Structural and Personal Frameworks to interpret artworks and document and reflect on their own ideas and art making. Students learn how to formulate and substantiate personal opinions about artworks. Practical work explores the art process to create visual responses that demonstrate personal interests and ideas.

Unit 2

Students use the Cultural and Contemporary Frameworks to discuss and compare artworks from different cultures and times. Students use the art process to produce at least one finished art work that explores social and/or personal ideas and issues.

Unit 3

Students use the Analytical Frameworks to analyse and interpret artworks produced before 1990 and since 1990, and compare the meaning and messages of these artworks. Students produce at least one finished artwork and use the Analytical Frameworks to document and evaluate the progressive development and refinement of their artistic practice.

Unit 4

Students examine and analyse an art idea and its related issues to inform their viewpoint. Students apply the art process to progressively communicate ideas, directions and personal concepts in a body of work that includes at least one finished art work and use selected aspects of the Analytical frameworks to underpin reflections on their art making.

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Biology

Unit 1

In this unit students examine the cell as the structural and functional unit of life, including the requirements for sustaining cellular processes. Students focus on cell growth, replacement and death and the role of stem cells in differentiation. Links between cell specialisation and the function of systems in plants and animals are explored, including the role of homeostatic mechanisms. Students undertake a student-designed scientific investigation related to the function and/or the regulation of cells or systems involving the generation of primary data.

Unit 2

This unit explores reproduction, inheritance and impacts on biodiversity. Students compare modes of reproduction, including cloning technologies. They explore the nature of adaptations and the impacts on population distribution and abundance. Consideration is given to the contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge and perspectives in understanding the survival of organisms in Australian ecosystems. Students undertake a student-directed research investigation into a contemporary ethical issue relating to application of genetic knowledge, reproductive science, inheritance or adaptations and interdependencies beneficial for survival.

Unit 3

In this unit students investigate the workings of the cell including the relationship between nucleic acids and proteins. They explore the structure, regulation and rate of biochemical pathways with reference to cellular respiration and photosynthesis. Students will apply their knowledge of cellular processes through investigation of a selected case study, data analysis and/or bioethical issue. Students undertake a student-designed scientific investigation related to cellular processes and/or responses to challenges over time in either Unit 3 or Unit 4 (assessed as Unit 4 Outcome 3).

Unit 4

This unit considers the continual change and challenges to which life on Earth has been, and continues to be, subject to. Students study the immune system, specific immunity and respond to bioethical issues and challenges associated with disease. Evidence for evolution is explored and highlighted as an example of interpretations being contested, refined and challenged over time as new evidence is uncovered. Students investigate a selected case study, data analysis and/or bioethical issues related to the key ideas. Students undertake a student-designed scientific investigation related to cellular processes and/or responses to challenges over time in either Unit 3 or Unit 4 (assessed as Unit 4 Outcome 3).

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Business Management

Unit 1

Businesses of all sizes are major contributors to the economic and social wellbeing of a nation. Therefore, how businesses are formed and the fostering of conditions under which new business ideas can emerge, are vital for a nation’s wellbeing. Taking a business idea and planning how to make it a reality are the cornerstones of economic and social development.

Unit 2

This unit focuses on the establishment phase of a business’s life. Establishing a business involves complying with legal requirements as well as making decisions about how best to establish a system of financial record keeping, staff the business and establish a customer base. Students will also examine the legal requirements that must be satisfied to establish a business. They investigate the essential features of effective marketing and consider the best way to meet the needs of the business in terms of staffing and financial record keeping.

Unit 3

In this unit students explore the key processes and issues concerned with managing a business efficiently and effectively to achieve the business objectives. Students examine the different types of businesses and their respective objectives. They consider corporate culture, management styles, management skills and the relationship between each of these. Students investigate strategies to manage both staff and business operations to meet objectives.

Unit 4

Businesses are under constant pressure to adapt and change to meet their objectives. In this unit, students consider the importance of reviewing key performance indicators to determine current performance and the strategic management necessary to position a business for the future. Students study a theoretical model to undertake change and consider a variety of strategies to manage change in the most efficient and effective way to improve business performance. They investigate the importance of leadership in change management.

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Chemistry

Unit 1

Students investigate the chemical properties of a range of materials from metals and salts to polymers and nanomaterials. They are introduced to quantitative concepts, including the mole, and apply their knowledge to determine the relative masses of elements and the composition of substances.

Unit 2

Students explore the physical and chemical properties of water, the reactions that occur in water and various methods of water analysis. They are introduced to stoichiometry and to analytical techniques and instrumental procedures. Students explore the solvent properties of water in a variety of contexts and analyse selected issues associated with substances dissolved in water.

Unit 3

Students explore energy options and the chemical production of materials with reference to efficiencies, renewability and minimisation of their impact on the environment. Different chemical energy resources are compared and the combustion of fuels, including their energy transformations, investigated. Students analyse manufacturing processes and explain the conditions that will improve efficiency and yield of chemical processes.

Unit 4

Students identify the unique characteristics of carbon and investigate the structural features, bonding, reactions and uses of the major families of organic compounds. Through the use of instrumental analyses, organic structures are confirmed. Students explore the chemical structures of key food molecules and the reactions in which they are involved, including the role of enzymes and the energy released during their combustion.

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Drama

Unit 1

In this unit, students study three or more performance styles from a range of social, historical and cultural contexts. They examine drama traditions of ritual and storytelling to devise performances that go beyond re-creation and/or representation of real life as it is lived. This unit focusses on creating, presenting and analysing a devised solo and/or ensemble performance.

Unit 2

In this unit, students study aspects of Australian identity evident in contemporary drama practice. This may also involve exploring the work of selected drama practitioners and associated performance styles. This unit focusses on the use and documentation of the processes involved in constructing and analysing a devised solo or ensemble performance.

Unit 3

In this unit, students explore the work of drama practitioners and draw on contemporary practice as they devise ensemble performance work. Students explore performance styles and associated conventions from a diverse range of contemporary and/or traditional contexts and document and evaluate stages involved in the creation, development and presentation of the ensemble performances.

Unit 4

This unit focuses on the development and the presentation of devised solo performances. Students explore contemporary practice and works that are eclectic in nature; that is, they draw on a range of performance styles and associated conventions from a diverse range of contemporary and traditional contexts. Students document and evaluate the stages of involvement in the creation, development and presentation of their solo performance.

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English

Unit 1

In this unit, students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences. Students develop their skills in creating written, spoken and multimodal texts.

Unit 2

In this unit, students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in texts. They analyse arguments presented and the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences.

Students develop their skills in creating written, spoken and multimodal texts.

Unit 3

In this unit, students read and respond to text analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts.

Unit 4

In this unit, students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in texts. They create an oral presentation intended to position audiences about an issue currently debated in the media.

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English Language

Unit 1

In this unit, students consider the way language is organised so that its users have the means to make sense of their experiences and to interact with others. Students explore the various functions of language and the nature of language as an elaborate system of signs.

Unit 2

In this unit, students focus on language change. Languages are dynamic and language change is an inevitable and continuous process. Students consider factors contributing to change over time in the English language and factors contributing to the spread of English.

Unit 3

In this unit, students investigate English language in contemporary Australian social settings, along a continuum of informal and formal registers. They consider language as a means of social interaction, exploring how through written and spoken texts we communicate information, ideas, attitudes, prejudices and ideological stances.

Unit 4

In this unit, students focus on the role of language in establishing and challenging different identities. There are many varieties of English used in contemporary Australian society, including national, regional, cultural and social variations. Standard Australian English is the variety that is granted prestige in contemporary Australian society and it has a role in establishing national identity.

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Environmental Science

Unit 1

Students examine Earth as a set of four interacting systems. They explore the physical requirements for life in terms of inputs and outputs and consider the effects of natural and human-induced changes in ecosystems. They investigate the physical environment and its components and consider how the biotic and abiotic components of local ecosystems can be monitored and measured.

Unit 2

Students explore the concept of pollution and associated impacts on Earth’s four systems through global, national and local perspectives. They analyse the effects of pollutants on the health of humans and the environment over time and consider how values, beliefs and evidence affect environmental decision making. Students compare three pollutants of national and/or global significance with reference to their effects in the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere, and discuss management options.

Unit 3

Students focus on environmental management through the sustainability principles. They analyse threats to biodiversity and evaluate management strategies for threatened endemic species. Students explore management of an Earth systems scale with reference to the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. Students compare three pollutants of national and/or global significance with reference to their effects in the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere, and discuss their management options.

Unit 4

Students analyse the impacts of energy production and use on society and the environment. They explore interacting systems that influence climate. Students examine principles associated with energy, compare efficiencies of the use of renewable and non-renewable energy resources, and consider how science can be used to reduce the impacts of energy production and use.

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Extended Investigation

(Extended Investigation is only offered as a Unit 3 and 4 sequence across Victoria. As such, students may either apply to complete the Unit 3 and 4 sequence as part of accelerated studies, or complete the subject as a Year 12 student as there are no prerequisites for enrolment.)

Unit 3

In this unit students develop skills in question construction and design, explore the nature and purpose of research and various research methodologies, critically review research literature and identify a specific research question. Students undertake initial research and document their progress in their Extended Investigation Journal. They use their Journal to record the progressive refinement of a selected area of interest and the distillation of an individual research question.

Unit 4

In this area of study students devise a research question that is of significance and requires a detailed inquiry. They set the parameters for their research and examine a range of research methods. Students also explore the purpose and ethics of undertaking research, the importance of protecting the subjects of research from any harm and the relationship between ethical research and potential benefit.

Please note: External assessment - Students should note that Extended Investigation entails two external examinations administered by the VCAA. The first is the Unit 3 Critical Thinking Test which assesses logic and reasoning, as well as a student’s sense of argument. The second is an oral presentation to a panel accompanied by a written report of the student’s investigation, completed in Unit 4. The oral presentation will include a question and answer component with the panel.

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Food Studies

Unit 1

Practical cooking tasks are integrated with theoretical understanding of topics that include the origins and cultural roles of food from early civilisations through to today’s industrialised and global world. This unit investigates and utilises foods indigenous to Australia and those introduced through migration in the preparation of food products.

Unit 2

This unit investigates food systems in contemporary Australia, focusing on commercial and small-scale domestic food production, giving insight into the significance of food industries to the Australian economy. The practical component of this unit allows for the design of new food products and recipe adaptations to suit particular needs and circumstances and the exploration of entrepreneurial opportunities.

Unit 3

Unit 3 investigates the many roles and everyday influences of food. It explores the science of food, physiology of eating and appreciating food and the microbiology of digestion. The practical component includes the application of specific techniques to the production of everyday food that facilitates the establishment of nutritious and sustainable meal patterns.

Unit 4

This unit examines debates about global and Australian food systems, focussing on issues about the environment, ecology, ethics, farming practices, the development and application of technologies and the challenges of food security, food safety and food wastage. The practical component allows for opportunities to apply knowledge and responses to environmental and ethical food issues, reflecting on the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating.

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Foundation English (VCAL Program)

Units 1 & 2

The Foundation English course is designed around one compulsory area of study, Essentials of English and five optional areas of study from which one must be selected for study in each unit. These areas of study are not discrete. Each contains aspects of other areas of study and the modes of language – speaking and listening, reading and writing – define the outcomes, key knowledge, key skills and learning activities in all areas of the course.

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Health and Human Development

Unit 1

This unit looks at health and wellbeing as a concept with varied and evolving perspectives and definitions. It takes the view that health and wellbeing are subject to a wide range of contexts and interpretations, with different meanings for different people.

Unit 2

This unit investigates transitions in health, wellbeing and development from lifespan and societal perspectives. Students look at changes and expectations that are part of the progression from youth to adulthood.

Unit 3

This unit looks at health, wellbeing and illness as multidimensional, dynamic and subject to different interpretations and contexts. Students begin to explore health and wellbeing as a global concept and to take a broader approach to inquiry. As they consider the benefits of optimal health and wellbeing and its importance as an individual and a collective resource, their thinking extends to health as a universal right.

Unit 4

This unit examines health and wellbeing, and human development in a global context. Students use data to investigate health status and burden of disease in different countries, exploring factors that contribute to health inequalities between and within countries, including the physical, social and economic conditions in which people live.

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History

Unit 1: Modern History

In this unit, students investigate the nature of social, political, economic and cultural change in the later part of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. The late 19th century marked a challenge to existing empires, alongside growing militarism and imperialism. Empires continued to exert their powers as they competed for new territories, resources and labour across Asia-Pacific, Africa and the Americas, contributing to tremendous change. World War One was a significant turning point in modern history. It represented a complete departure from the past and heralded changes that were to have significant consequences for the rest of the twentieth century. The period after World War One, in the contrasting decades of the 1920s and 1930s, was characterised by significant social, political, economic, cultural and technological change. In 1920 the League of Nations was established, but despite its ideals about future peace, subsequent events and competing ideologies would contribute to the world being overtaken by war in 1939. New fascist governments used the military, education and propaganda to impose controls on the way people lived, to exclude particular groups of people and to silence criticism.

Unit 2: Modern History

In this unit students investigate the nature and impact of the Cold War and challenges and changes to social, political and economic structures and systems of power in the second half of the twentieth century and the first decade of the twenty-first century. The establishment of the United Nations (UN) in 1945 was intended to take an internationalist approach to avoiding warfare, resolving political tensions and addressing threats to human life and safety. The period also saw continuities in and challenges and changes to the established social, political and economic order in many countries. The continuation of moves towards decolonisation led to independence movements in former colonies in Africa, the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific. The second half of the twentieth century also saw the rise of social movements that challenged existing values and traditions, such as the civil rights movement, feminism and environmental movements, as well as new political partnerships, such as the UN, European Union, APEC, OPEC, ASEAN and the British Commonwealth of Nations. The beginning of the twenty-first century heralded both a changing world order and further advancements in technology and social mobility on a global scale. However, terrorism remained a major threat, influencing politics, social dynamics and the migration of people across the world.

Units 3 & 4: Revolutions

Students investigate the significant historical causes and consequences of political revolution. Revolutions are a major turning point which bring about the collapse and destruction of an existing political order resulting in a pervasive change to society. Revolutions are caused by the interplay of ideas, events, individuals and popular movements. Their consequences have a profound effect on the political and social structures of the post-revolutionary society. Revolution is a dramatically accelerated process whereby the new order attempts to create political and social change and transformation based on a new ideology.

At Marist-Sion College the Russian Revolution is studied for Unit 3 (Semester 1) while the American Revolution is studied for Unit 4 (Semester 2).

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Languages: Japanese

Unit 1

Students are required to exchange meaning in a spoken interaction in Japanese; interpret information from two texts on the same subtopic presented in Japanese, and respond with written Japanese and English; present information, concepts and ideas in written Japanese on a selected subtopic and for a specific audience and purpose.

Unit 2

Students are required to respond in writing in Japanese to spoken, written or visual texts presented in Japanese; analyse and use information from written, spoken or visual texts to produce an extended written response in Japanese; explain information, ideas and concepts orally in Japanese to a specific audience about an aspect of culture within communities where Japanese is spoken.

Unit 3

Students are required to participate in a spoken exchange in Japanese to resolve a personal issue; interpret information from texts and write responses in Japanese; express ideas in a personal, informative or imaginative piece of writing in Japanese.

Unit 4

Students are required to share information, ideas and opinions in a spoken exchange in Japanese; analyse information from written, spoken and viewed texts for use in a written response in Japanese; present information, concepts and ideas in evaluative or persuasive writing on an issue in Japanese.

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Legal Studies

Unit 1

Criminal law and civil law aim to achieve social cohesion and protect the rights of individuals. Criminal law is aimed at maintaining social order and infringing criminal law can result in charges. Civil law deals with the infringement of a person’s or group’s rights and breaching civil law can result in litigation. In this unit, students develop an understanding of legal foundations, such as the different types and sources of law and the existence of a Court hierarchy in Victoria.

Unit 2

Criminal law and civil law aim to protect the rights of individuals. When rights are infringed, a case or dispute may arise which needs to be determined or resolved and sanctions or remedies may be imposed. This unit focuses on the enforcement of criminal law and civil law, the methods and institutions that may be used to determine a criminal case or resolve a civil dispute and the purposes and types of sanctions and remedies and their effectiveness.

Unit 3

The Victorian justice system, which includes the criminal and civil justice systems, aims to protect the rights of individuals and uphold the principles of justice: fairness, equality and access. In this unit, students examine the methods and institutions in the justice system and consider their appropriateness in determining criminal cases and resolving civil disputes. Students consider the Magistrates’ Court, County Court and Supreme Court within the Victorian Court hierarchy, as well as other Victorian legal institutions and bodies available to assist with cases.

Unit 4

The study of Australia’s laws and legal system involves an understanding of institutions that make and reform our laws, and the relationship between the Australian people, the Australian Constitution and law-making bodies. In this unit, students explore how the Australian Constitution establishes the law-making powers of the Commonwealth and State parliaments, and protects the Australian people through structures that act as a check on parliament in law-making. Students develop an understanding of the significance of the High Court in protecting and interpreting the Australian Constitution. They investigate parliament and the courts, and the relationship between the two in law-making, and consider the roles of the individual, the media and law reform bodies in influencing law reform.

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Literature

Unit 1

In this unit, students focus on the ways in which the interaction between text and reader creates meaning. Students’ analyses of the features and conventions of texts help them develop increasingly discriminating responses to a range of literary forms and styles. Students respond critically, creatively and reflectively.

Unit 2

In this unit, students explore the ways literary texts connect with each other and with the world. They deepen their examination of the ways their own culture and the cultures represented in texts can influence their interpretations and shape different meanings.

Unit 3

In this unit, students consider how the form of a text affects meaning and how writers construct their texts. They investigate ways writers adapt and transform texts and how meaning is affected as texts are adapted and transformed. Students develop creative responses to texts.

Unit 4

In this unit, students develop critical and analytic responses to texts. They investigate literary criticism informing both the reading and writing of texts. Students develop an informed and sustained interpretation supported by close textual analysis.

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Mathematics

Year 12 Numeracy (VCAL Program)

Unit 1

Students explore Mathematics beyond its familiar and everyday use to its application in wider, less personal contexts such as newspapers and other media reports, workplace documents and procedures, and specific projects at home or in the community. The students will be assessed by projects, assignments and worksheets.

Unit 2

Students develop, refine, extend and apply numeracy knowledge and skills through an investigation in an unfamiliar industry area in which they have an interest and may seek future employment. The numeracy involved focusses on number, measurement, financial numeracy, and probability and statistics. The students will be assessed by projects, assignments and worksheets.


General Mathematics

Unit 1

Students who complete this course, work through univariate data, bivariate data, linear equations and linear graphs. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework), topic tests, assignments and semester examinations. This course is aimed at those students wishing to study Further Mathematics Units 3 and 4.

Unit 2

Students who complete this course, work through linear programming, financial mathematics, matrices and trigonometry. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework), topic tests, assignments and semester examinations. This course is aimed at those students wishing to study Further Mathematics Units 3 and 4.

VCE General Mathematics (modified for VCAL)

This Mathematics Course is designed for students undertaking the VCAL Program. It provides courses to compliment their VCAL Studies whilst allowing them to progress to Further Mathematics in Year 12. This modified course is drawn from all aspects of VCE General Mathematics: Units 1 and 2 as seen above.


Mathematical Methods

Unit 1

Students who complete this course, work through linear equations and coordinate geometry, quadratics, functions and relations, polynomials, transformations and probability. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework), topic tests, assignments and semester examinations. This course is aimed at those students wishing to study Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4.

Unit 2

Students who complete this course, work through exponential functions and logarithms, circular functions, differentiation, anti-differentiation of polynomials and integration. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework), topic tests, assignments and semester examinations. This course is aimed at those students wishing to study Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4.

Unit 3

Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 are completely prescribed and extend the introductory study of simple elementary functions of a single real variable to include combinations of these functions - algebra, calculus, probability and statistics - and their applications in a variety of practical and theoretical contexts.

For Unit 3, the areas of study include functions and relations, differentiation, transformations, exponential functions, logarithms and circular functions. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework), topic tests and the VCAA examinations.

Unit 4

Students complete course work, through differentiation, integration, discrete random variables, continuous random variables, sampling and estimation. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework), topic tests and the VCAA examinations.

Specialist Mathematics

Unit 1

Students who complete this course, work through algebra, number systems, variation, geometry and complex numbers. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework), topic tests, assignments and semester examinations. This course is aimed at those students wishing to study Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4.

Unit 2

Students who complete this course, work through transformations, vectors, variation, complex numbers, and statistics. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework), topic tests, assignments and semester examinations. This course is aimed at those students wishing to study Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4.

Unit 3

Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4 includes functions and relations, algebra, calculus, vectors, mechanics and probability and statistics.

For Unit 3, the areas of study include functions and relations, vectors, circular functions, complex numbers and the Modulus operations. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework), topic tests and the VCAA examinations.

Unit 4

Students complete course work, through differentiation, rational functions, derivatives of inverse circular functions, integration, volumes of solids of revolution, lengths of curves on a plane, differential equations, kinematics, linear combinations of random variables and dynamics. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework), topic tests and the VCAA examinations.


Further Mathematics

Unit 3

Further Mathematics is designed to provide access to worthwhile and challenging mathematical learning in a way which takes into account the interests, needs, dispositions and aspirations of a wide range of students and introduces them to key aspects of the discipline. It is also designed to promote students’ awareness of the importance of mathematics in everyday life in a technological society and to develop confidence and the disposition to make effective use of mathematical concepts, processes and skills in practical and theoretical contexts. Students who complete this course, work through data analysis, recursion and financial modelling. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework), topic tests and the VCAA examinations.

Unit 4

Students who complete this course work through matrices, and graphs and relations. The students will be assessed by SACs (School Assessed Coursework), topic tests and the VCAA examinations.

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Media

Unit 1

In this unit students develop an understanding of audiences and the core concepts underpinning the construction of representations and meaning in different media forms. They explore media codes and conventions and the construction of meaning in media products.

Unit 2

In this unit students further develop an understanding of the concept of narrative in media products and forms in different contexts. Narratives in both traditional and newer forms include film, television, sound, news, print, photography, games and interactive digital forms. Students analyse the influence of developments in media technologies on individuals and society, examining in a range of media forms the effects of media convergence and hybridisation on the design, production and distribution of narratives in the media and audience engagement, consumption and reception.

Unit 3 (introduced in 2022)

In this unit students explore stories that circulate in society through media narratives. They consider the use of media codes and conventions to structure meaning, and how this construction is influenced by the social, cultural, ideological and institutional contexts of production, distribution, consumption and reception. Students assess how audiences from different periods of time and contexts are engaged by, consume and read narratives using appropriate media language.

Unit 4 (introduced in 2022)

In this unit students focus on the production and post-production stages of the media production process, bringing the media production design created in Unit 3 to its realisation. They refine their media production in response to feedback and through personal reflection, documenting the iterations of their production as they work towards completion. Students explore the relationship between the media and audiences, focusing on the opportunities and challenges afforded by current developments in the media industry. They consider the nature of communication between the media and audiences, explore the capacity of the media to be used by governments, institutions and audiences, and analyse the role of the Australian government in regulating the media.


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Music Performance

Unit 1

This unit focusses on building performance and musicianship skills. Students present performances of selected group and solo music works using one or more instruments. They study the work of other performers and explore strategies to optimise their own approach to performance. They identify technical, expressive and stylistic challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and practise technical work to address these challenges. They also develop skills in performing previously unseen music. Students study aural, theory and analysis concepts to develop their musicianship skills and apply this knowledge when preparing and presenting performances.

Unit 2

This unit focusses on building performance and musicianship skills. Students present performances of selected group and solo music works using one or more instruments and take opportunities to perform in familiar and unfamiliar venues and spaces. They study the work of other performers and refine selected strategies to optimise their own approach to performance. They identify technical, expressive and stylistic challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and endeavour to address these challenges. Students develop their listening, aural, theoretical and analytical musicianship skills and apply this knowledge when preparing and presenting performances.

Unit 3

This unit focusses on further development and refinement of performance and musicianship skills. Students focus on either group or solo performance and continue preparation of a performance program they will present in the end-of-year examination. All students present performances of both group and solo music works using one or more instruments and take opportunities to perform in familiar and unfamiliar venues and spaces. Through analyses of other performers’ interpretations and feedback on their own performances, students refine their interpretations and optimise their approach to performance. They continue to address challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and to strengthen their listening, aural, theoretical and analytical musicianship skills.

Unit 4

This unit focusses on further development and refinement of performance and musicianship skills. Students focus on either group or solo performance and continue preparation of a performance program they will present in the end-of-year examination. All students present performances of both group and solo music works using one or more instruments and take opportunities to perform in familiar and unfamiliar venues and spaces. Through analyses of other performers’ interpretations and feedback on their own performances, students refine their interpretations and optimise their approach to performance. They continue to address challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and to strengthen their listening, aural, theoretical and analytical musicianship skills.

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Outdoor and Environmental Studies

Unit 1

This unit examines some of the ways in which humans understand and relate to nature through experiences of outdoor environments. Students develop a clear understanding of the range of motivations for interacting with outdoor environments and the factors that affect an individual’s access to outdoor experiences and relationships with outdoor environments. Students understand the links between their practical experience at Point Leo, Mornington Peninsula and theoretical investigations, gaining insight into a variety of responses to, and relationships with, nature.

Unit 2

This unit focusses on the characteristics of outdoor environments and different ways of understanding them, as well as the impact of humans on outdoor environments. In this unit, students study the impact of nature on humans, the ecological, social and economic implications of the impact of technologies and changing human lifestyles on outdoor environments. Students examine a number of case studies on specific outdoor environments, including areas where there is evidence of human intervention. They develop the practical skills required to minimise the impact of humans on outdoor environments.

Unit 3

This unit considers the ecological, historical and social context of relationships between humans and outdoor environments in Australia. Students should experience one or more outdoor environments that have characteristics of natural environments and evidence of human intervention.

Unit 4

This unit focusses on the conservation and use of the natural environment. Students should experience one or more outdoor environments that have characteristics of natural environments and evidence of human intervention.

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Please note: For students undertaking Units 3 and 4 Outdoor Environmental Studies, the compulsory camps will be held over Friday, Saturday and Sunday to reduce the amount of time missed in other VCE subjects.


Physical Education

Unit 1

Students explore how the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems work together to produce movement. Through practical activities students explore the relationship between the body systems and physical activity, sport and exercise, and how the systems adapt and adjust to the demands of the activity. They explore how the capacity and functioning of each system acts as an enabler or barrier to movement and participation in physical activity.

Unit 2

Students investigate physical activity, sport and society from a participatory perspective. Students are introduced to types of physical activity and the role participation in physical activity and sedentary behavior plays in their own health and wellbeing as well as in other people’s lives in different population groups.

Unit 3

Students examine biomechanical and skill acquisition principles used to analyse human movement skills and energy production from a physiological perspective.

Unit 4

Students analyse movement skills from a physiological, psychological and sociocultural perspective, and apply relevant training principles and methods to improve performance within physical activity at an individual, club and elite level.

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Physics

Unit 1

Students explore how physics explains phenomena, at various scales, which are not always visible to the unaided eye. Students consider thermal concepts by investigating heat, probe common analogies used to explain electricity and consider the origins and formation of matter.

Unit 2

Students investigate a variety of phenomena by making their own observations and generating questions which, in turn, lead to experiments. They explore the ways in which forces are involved in both moving objects and in keeping objects stationary. Students will be offered options for study during which they investigate a selected question.

Unit 3

In this unit, students explore the importance of energy in explaining and describing the physical world. They examine the production of electricity and delivery to homes, along with the effects of gravitational, electric and magnetic fields. Newton’s laws are used to investigate motion and Einstein’s theories are introduced. Students design and undertake investigations involving at least two continuous independent variables.

Unit 4

Students explore the use of wave and particle theories to model the properties of light and matter. Through their studies they are able to explain the behavior of light and matter and consider relationships between the two. Students learn to think beyond the concepts experienced in everyday life to study the physical world from a new perspective. Students design and undertake investigations involving at least two continuous independent variables.

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Product Design and Technology (Textiles)

Unit 1

Design often involves the refinement and improvement of existing products. This unit focusses on the analysis, modification and three improvements to a product design to make it more suitable at addressing the end users requirements.

Unit 2

In this unit, students work in teams to design and develop an item in a product range or contribute to the design, planning and production of a group product. They focus on factors including human needs and wants; function, purpose and context for product design; aesthetics; materials and sustainability; and the impact of these factors on a design solution.

Product Design and Technology (Wood)

Unit 1

Design often involves the refinement and improvement of existing products. This unit focusses on the analysis, modification and three improvements to a product design to make it better and more sustainable.

Unit 2

In this unit, students work in teams to design and develop an item in a product range or contribute to the design, planning and production of a group product.

Unit 3

In this unit, students are engaged in the design and development of a product that meets the needs and expectations of a client and/or an end-user, developed through a design process and influenced by a range of complex factors.

Unit 4

In this unit, students learn that evaluations are made at various points of product design, development and production. In the role of designer, students judge the suitability and viability of design ideas.

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Psychology

Unit 1

Human development involves changes in thoughts, feelings and behaviours. In this unit students investigate the structure and functioning of the human brain and the role it plays in the overall functioning of the human nervous system.

Unit 2

A person’s thoughts, feelings and behaviours are influenced by a variety of biological, psychological and social factors. In this unit students investigate how perception of stimuli enables a person to interact with the world around them and how their perception of stimuli can be distorted.

Unit 3

This unit focuses on how the nervous systems influences behaviour and the way people experience the world. Students examine both macro-level and micro-level functioning of the nervous system to explain how the human nervous system enables a person to interact with the world around them. They explore how stress may affect a person’s psychological functioning and consider the causes and management of stress. Students investigate mechanisms of memory.

Unit 4

Consciousness and mental health are two of many psychological constructs that can be explored by studying the relationship between the mind, brain and behaviour. In this unit students examine the nature of consciousness and how changes in levels of consciousness can affect mental processes and behaviour. They consider the role of sleep and the impact that sleep disturbances may have on a person’s functioning.

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Religious Education

Year 11 Religious Education Options

Year 11 students will study the following VCE Units:

VCE Religion and Society: Unit 1 (Semester 1) AND

VCE Texts and Traditions: Unit 1 (Semester 2)

Year 11 VCAL students will study:

VCE Religion and Society: Unit 1 (Semesters 1 and 2)


Year 12 Religious Education Options

Year 12 VCE students will study one of the following options:

VCE Religion and Society: Unit 2 (Semesters 1 and 2) OR

VCE Religion and Society: Units 3 and 4 (Semesters 1 and 2)

Year 12 VCAL students will study the following option:

VCE Religion and Society: Unit 2

Religion and Society

Unit 1

In this unit students explore the origins of religions and the role of religions in the development of society, identifying the nature and purpose of religion over time. They investigate the contribution of religion generally to the development of human society. They also focus on the role of religious traditions over time in shaping personal and group identity. Students examine how individuals, groups and new ideas have affected and continue to affect religious traditions. The unit provides an opportunity for students to understand the often complex relationships that exist between individuals, groups, new ideas and religious traditions broadly and in the Australian society in which they live.

Unit 2

In this unit students study in detail various methods of ethical decision-making in at least two religious traditions and their related philosophical traditions. They explore ethical issues in societies where multiple worldviews coexist, in the light of these investigations.

Unit 3

In this unit students study the purposes of religion generally and then consider the religious beliefs developed by one or more than one religious tradition or denomination in response to the big questions of life. Students study how particular beliefs within one or more than one religious tradition or denomination may be expressed through the other aspects of religion, and explore how this is intended to foster meaning for adherence. Students then consider the interaction between significant life experience and religion.

Unit 4

This unit focusses on the interaction over time of religious traditions and the societies of which they are a part. Religious traditions are in a constant state of development as members apply their talents and faith to extend the intellectual and aesthetic nature of the beliefs, of their expression and of the application to their lives. In the interaction of religious traditions and society there are also opportunities for development from significant challenges, including the needs and insights of their membership, and of people and groups within wider society. These challenges and the religious tradition are influenced by broader contexts such as changing economic, political and social conditions. In this unit students explore challenge for religious traditions generally over time and then undertake a study of challenge and change for one or more than one religious tradition or denomination.

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Texts and Traditions

Unit 1

In this unit students examine the place of texts and their literary forms within a religious tradition. Story-telling is one of the major literary forms in religious traditions; other forms include law, prophecy, sacred songs, reflection and instruction. Students explore the importance of texts at the source of a tradition and how their meaning for the earlier and continuing tradition might be found and described. This unit introduces students to basic methods of exegesis to bring about a deeper awareness of how texts came about and the meaning of texts to the religious tradition. This unit also explores how texts have been used by people both within and beyond the religious tradition to bring meaning to issues or ideas in a new cultural setting. This unit requires the study of texts in a variety of literary forms. The texts may come from one religious tradition or from a range of religious traditions.

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Studio Art

Unit 1

The focus of this unit is the use of sources of inspiration and ideas as the basis for artworks and the exploration of a wide range of materials and techniques as tools for translating ideas, observations and experiences into visual form. The application of materials and techniques and interpretation of sources of inspiration by artists from different times and cultures is also examined.

Unit 2

The focus of this unit is for students to establish and use an effective design methodology for the production of a folio of artworks. Students also develop skills in the analysis of artworks to understand how aesthetic qualities are created, ideas communicated and styles developed.

Unit 3

Students use an exploration proposal and apply a studio process to explore and develop their ideas and produce a range of potential directions that will form the basis of artworks in Unit 4. The unit also explores professional art practices in relation to particular art form(s) and the development of distinctive styles in artworks.

Unit 4

This unit focuses on the production of a cohesive folio of finished art works. Students present visual and written documentation. This unit also explores aspects of artists’ involvement in the current art industry focussing on the role of galleries and the methods and considerations involved in the preparation, presentation and conservation of artworks.

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Theatre Studies

Unit 1

Students apply acting, direction, design and performance analysis in relation to theatre styles from the pre-modern era (prior to the 1920s). Students creatively and imaginatively work in production roles to shape a performance for an audience. They also analyse professional and student devised work.

Unit 2

Students apply acting, direction, design and performance analysis in relation to theatre styles from the pre-modern era (1920s to the present). Students creatively and imaginatively work in production roles to shape a performance for an audience. They also analyse professional and student devised work.

Unit 3

Students develop an interpretation of a script through the three stages of the theatre production process: planning, development and presentation. Students specialise in two production roles and use knowledge of this process to analyse and evaluate professional and student devised performances.

Unit 4

Students study a scene and an associated monologue. They initially develop an interpretation of the prescribed scene. This work includes exploring theatrical possibilities and using dramaturgy across the three stages of the production process. In this unit students will complete school based course work as well as a VCE performance and VCE written exam.

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Visual Communication Design

Unit 1

Students will develop skills in drawing methods used from observation, visualisation and presentation. They will create drawings for different purposes using a range of drawing methods, media and materials. Design elements and principles and their interplay are applied to this understanding when creating visual communications in response to the stated purpose. The written task will focus on the history of design from the Art Craft Movement to present day looking at the social, economic, technological and political impact on design.

Unit 2

This unit offers a practical context for learning and applying drawing methods and an understanding and application of basic typography components. Students develop their knowledge and practice of the application of appropriate basic drawing conventions through either environmental or industrial/product contexts. Students explore typography. Students are introduced to the design process.

Unit 3

Students complete a range of design exercises to develop an understanding of the breadth of visual language employed in visual communication design fields: Environmental, Industrial and Communication. Students will describe how visual communications are designed and produced in the design industry and explain factors that influence these practices. Students apply design thinking skills to develop a creative client brief and research to generate a range of visual ideas.

Unit 4

The focus is the final stage of the design process where two distinctive final presentations are produced and presented.

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