Year 9

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Victorian Curriculum – Year 7 to Year 10

In 2021, our Curriculum will be drawn from the Victorian Curriculum Foundation to Level 10 (F – 10 levels). The Victorian Curriculum sets out what every student should learn during his or her first eleven years of schooling. The Curriculum has been developed as the common set of knowledge and skills required by students for life-long learning, social development and informed citizenship at this time in our society.

The Victorian Curriculum Foundation to Level 10 incorporates the Australian Curriculum and reflects Victorian priorities and standards. Victorian Government and Catholic Schools are required to use the Victorian Curriculum Foundation to 10 Levels.

At the College, we will continue to develop and enhance curriculum structures and programs to provide our students with every opportunity to achieve high levels of attainment. This includes gifted and talented students who are able to work well above the nominally age expected level of achievement.

The Curriculum is structured as a range of levels of learning and achievement. Starting in Primary School at Foundation Level, the teaching and learning programs develop the students’ learning abilities to progress through the levels of attainment into Year 10 at Secondary School. This enables the development of targeted learning programs for all students, where the curriculum is used to plan for the actual learning level of each student rather than their assumed level of learning based on age. It includes both knowledge and skills. Learning Areas and Capabilities define these as set out in the table below. All Learning Areas provide students with the opportunity to develop skills in the Capabilities.

There is more information available at: http://victoriancurriculum.vcaa.vic.edu.au/

Year 9 Course Information Video

https://clickv.ie/w/TYvn

Year 9 Course Information

Year 9 Programs

There will be two program options available to Year 9 students:

Program 1: Year 9 Standard Program

Program 2: Year 9 Project Based Learning Program

Programs 1 and 2 run for the entire year. Once enrolled in their Program of choice, students remain in it for the entire year.

Subject Availability

Every effort will be made to place students into their subject choices. However, the availability of subjects offered in the Course Guide will depend on the number of students selecting the subject and staff availability. Subject lines may also impact a students elective choices. In these instances, students will be supported in selecting an alternate subject if needed.

The College Timetable

The timetable will consist of 5 lessons per day in a 10 day cycle. Each lesson will be either 55 or 60 minutes.

Year 9 Curriculum Structure Table

The table shows the allocation of the 50 lessons available per cycle for each Year level. Table 1 will display the lesson allocation per cycle for the Standard Program and Table 2 with show the lesson allocations per cycle for the Project Based Learning Program.

Year 9 Trade Pathways Video

https://clickv.ie/w/Ypwn

Future pathways for students

Both the Year 9 Standard Program and Year 9 Project Based Learning Program will allow a student to access to any Year 10 program offered in the following year.

Trade Pathway Program (TPP)

An optional Year 9 program, run through local training providers, providing insight on what it would be like to undertake Applied Learning pathways in Year 10 and beyond.

Trade Pathways Program (TPP)

The Trade Pathways Program caters for youth who are passionate about working in the trade industry. Typically, students are serious about successfully completing certificates, workplace learning and courses that will prepare them for industry apprenticeships when they complete their Senior Schooling. It is our expectation and experience that students in the Trade Pathways Program approach their work with a high degree of focus in the workshop, the workplace and the classroom.

This program operates one day per week. Students who are selected to be in this program enrol in a full Year 9 Program. Teachers are then advised which classes students will miss each week so their learning tasks can be adjusted to accommodate participation in this program.

Entry is by application and interview only. Students will need to express their interest in being part of this program when they enter their Year 9 web preference form. This program is purely experiential and there is no certified qualification/s associated with completion of the Trade Pathways Program.

For more information, please contact Ben Cunningham (bcunningham@mscw.vic.edu.au) or Elly Martin (emartin@mscw.vic.edu.au).

General overview informational video:

https://youtu.be/q98_2nVVIyE

Parent and student program information video:

https://youtu.be/BANEkBIrNUA

TPP automotive video:

https://youtu.be/6CuDJkomL5Q

TPP carpentry video:

https://youtu.be/Zv4l0DBHS2E

TPP plumbing video:

https://youtu.be/nDsKvOe8PO0

TPP engineering video:

https://youtu.be/x7JbIW0xtEw

TPP rural studies video:

https://youtu.be/fbUU3wgd698


Year 9 Elective Units Offered

Computing

  • Coding and Robotics

  • Computer Programming

  • Digital Media Production

English

  • Enrichment English and Creative Writing

Health and Physical Education

  • Fitness and Training

Humanities

  • Australian Politics

  • Justice, Money and Markets

Languages

  • Japanese (Semester 1)

  • Japanese (Semester 2)

Mathematics

  • Enrichment Mathematics

Performing Arts

  • Dance

  • Drama

  • Music and Technology (Semester 1)

  • Music Performance (Semester 2)

Technology

  • Agriculture

  • Backyard Blitz

  • Food Technology Around the World

  • Introduction to Metal Work

  • Textiles

  • Making a Model in Wood

Visual Arts

  • Media Arts

  • Visual Arts: 2D

  • Visual Arts: 3D

  • Visual Communication Design

Year 9 Program 1: Prescribed Studies

Religious Education

Marist-Sion College is inspired by the traditions of the Marist Brothers and the Sisters of Sion in its commitment to providing an education which integrates faith, learning and life in a welcoming community. The College affirms and promotes a Christian philosophy which values a faith-centred approach to life and upholds the uniqueness, integrity and dignity of all those involved in its community life. The Religious Education program is the formal and most obvious means by which this philosophy is passed on to our students and is an integral part of the College curriculum. Our students are invited to put faith into action, value learning for life and flourish as people. Religious Education at Year 9 level is studied in accordance with the Curriculum of the Diocese of Sale. Students complete an academic program of study, which includes knowledge, and understanding of the Catholic faith and are assessed on their knowledge of the units studied. Alongside the academic content, students are also given opportunities to broaden their own faith experience and to experience prayer, liturgy and reflective activities. There are four strands through which content is learned and Religious Education is shared and understood: Triune God, Life and Mission of Jesus, A Sacramental Church, and Christian Life and Catholic Social Teaching.

English

The study of English is central to the learning and development of all young Australians. It helps create confident communicators, imaginative thinkers and informed citizens. It is through the study of English that individuals learn to analyse, understand, communicate and build relationships with others and with the world around them. It helps them become ethical, thoughtful, informed and active members of society. Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They interpret, create, evaluate, discuss and perform a wide range of literary texts in which the primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade. These include various types of media texts, including newspapers, film and digital texts, fiction, non-fiction, poetry, dramatic performances and multimodal texts, with themes and issues involving levels of abstraction, higher order reasoning and intertextual references. Students develop a critical understanding of the contemporary media and the differences between media texts.

Health and Physical Education

The Year 9 Health and Physical Education program aims to develop students' knowledge, understanding and skills in order to strengthen their sense of identity and to build and manage satisfying relationships. The program provides opportunities for students to explore and analyse identity, sexuality, various challenges facing youth and risk minimisation strategies. Students will also prepare for their Grampians Camp by exploring the human impact on the environment, learning about first aid and practising various camp skills, such as preparing food on a Trangia and setting up tents. The Health and Physical Education program aims to offer students an experiential curriculum that is contemporary, relevant, challenging, enjoyable and physically active.

Humanities

Geography

The aims of Geography are to ensure that students develop a sense of wonder, curiosity and respect about places, people, cultures and environments throughout the world; a deep geographical knowledge of Australia and the world; and the capacity to be competent, critical and creative users of geographical inquiry methods and skills. Students consider changes in the characteristics of places and the implications of there. They consider significant spatial distributions and patterns and evaluate their understanding of geographical concepts, including place, space and interconnection.

Biomes and Food Security focuses on investigating the role of the biotic environment and its role in food and fibre production. Students examine biomes of the world, their alteration and significance as a source of food and fibre, and the environmental challenges and constraints on expanding food production in the future. Geographies of Interconnections focuses on investigating how people, through their choices and actions, are connected to places throughout the world in a wide variety of ways and how these connections help to make and change places and their environments.

History

In Year 9, students study the making of the modern world from 1750 to 1918. It covers the period of industrialisation and rapid change in the ways people lived, worked and thought, the era of nationalism and imperialism and the colonisation of Australia, which was part of the expansion of European power. This included the eras of the Industrial Revolution, the settlement of the Australian colonies and the moves towards self-government in 1901. The course culminates in a study of World War I (1914-1918), the ‘war to end all wars’.

Mathematics

The students in Year 9 work with Pythagoras’ theorem and trigonometry, number and financial mathematics, linear relations, measurement and geometry, rates and ratios, inequations, indices and surds, and statistics and probability. Through the use of an explicit teaching and differential model, the students work through problems based on the topic areas to develop the mathematical proficiencies of understanding, fluency, problem solving and reasoning. All students will develop their independent learning skills and habits including metacognition, knowing when and how to request assistance and develop examination techniques.

Science

The Science curriculum provides opportunities for students to develop an understanding of important scientific concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, the contribution of science to our culture and society and its applications in our lives. The curriculum supports students to develop the scientific knowledge, understandings and skills through their studies of: Biology (analysing how biological systems function and respond to external change); Chemistry (radioactivity explained in terms of atoms and energy change; balancing chemical equations and common chemical reactions); Earth and Space Science (global features and events, geological processes and timescales, analysis of interactions within and between Earth’s spheres); Environmental Science (interdependencies within a food web, energy transfers and flow of matter); and; Physics (concepts of voltage and current used to explain the operation of electric circuits, and a field model used to explain interactions between magnets).

Year 9 Program 2: Outline

Project based Learning is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an authentic, engaging and complex question, problem or challenge.

Students will complete an integrated curriculum where the following core subjects are covered.

  • Humanities

  • Science

  • Health and Physical Education

Throughout the year students will also demonstrate the following capabilities.

  • Personal and Social

  • Ethical

  • Critical

  • Creative Capabilities

Students will undertake two themed studies per semester, completing a project or smaller projects based around each theme.

The Project themes are:

  • Liveable Melbourne

  • Environmental Technology

  • Product Design and Development

  • How Do We Move and Passion Project

Students need to be:

  • Self-motivated

  • Organised

  • Show initiative and open to collaboration with others

  • Resourceful

  • Problem solvers

Year 9 Program 2: Prescribed Studies

Religious Education

Marist-Sion College is inspired by the traditions of the Marist Brothers and the Sisters or Sion in its commitment to providing an education which integrates faith, learning and life in a welcoming community. The College affirms and promotes a Christian philosophy which values and faith-centred approach to life and upholds the uniqueness, integrity and dignity of all those involved in its community life. The Religious Education program is the formal and most obvious means by which this philosophy is passed on to our students and is an integral part of the College curriculum. Our students are invited to put faith into action, value learning for life and flourish as people. Religious Education at Year 9 level is studied in accordance with the Curriculum of the Diocese of Sale. Students complete an academic program of study, which includes knowledge, and understanding of the Catholic faith and are assessed on their knowledge of the units studied. Alongside the academic content, students are also given opportunities to broaden their own faith experience and to experience prayer, liturgy and reflective activities. There are four strands through which content is learned and Religious Education is shared and understood: Triune God, Life and Mission of Jesus, A Sacramental Church, and Christian Life and Catholic Social Teaching.

English

The study of English is central to the learning and development of all young Australians. It helps create confident communicators, imaginative thinkers and informed citizens. It is through the study of English that individuals learn to analyse, understand, communicate and build relationships with others and with the world around them. It helps them become ethical, thoughtful, informed and active members of society. Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They interpret, create, evaluate, discuss and perform a wide range of literary texts in which the primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade. These include various types of media texts, including newspapers, film and digital texts, fiction, non-fiction, poetry, dramatic performances and multimodal texts, with themes and issues involving levels of abstraction, higher order reasoning and intertextual references. Students develop a critical understanding of the contemporary media and the differences between media texts.

Mathematics

The students in Year 9 work with Pythagoras’ theorem and trigonometry, number and financial mathematics, linear relations, measurement and geometry, rates and ratios, inequations, indices and surds, and statistics and probability. Through the use of an explicit teaching and differential model, the students work through problems based on the topic areas to develop the mathematical proficiencies of understanding, fluency, problem solving and reasoning. All students will develop their independent learning skills and habits including metacognition, knowing when and how to request assistance and develop examination techniques.


Project 1: Liveable Melbourne

Students will be given the opportunity to discover and explore Australia’s most liveable historical, cultural and sporting city. This project will consist of a series of visits to Melbourne.

Project 2: Environmental Technology

Students explore contemporary environmental issues and create their own natural alternatives to various everyday chemical-based consumables.


Project 3: Product Design and Development

Students learn how to design and develop products and product ranges from concept brief to an end product.

Project 4: How Do We Move and Passion Project

Students will spend a term exploring each of the following:

How Do We Move: We explore the physics behind what makes us move and in small groups, students will create their own Goldberg Machine.

Passion Project: Students engage their passion, unleash their creativity and are given the time and tools for innovation and discovery.


Year 9 Elective Program

(Available to all Year 9 Students)

Agriculture

This class focuses on a range of local Agricultural enterprises including Dairy and Beef farming. The major focus is on Cattle with topics including: introduction to cattle (breeds, structure, feed requirements, pests and disease); basic cattle handling skills (working in cattle yards, grooming and washing); basic ring craft (leading); caring for livestock/livestock management, understanding of the beef industry. Old clothes and steel capped work boots are required for this subject.

Australian Politics

Australian Politics build students’ understanding of the Australian political system and how it enables change. Students examine the ways political parties, interest groups, media and individuals influence government and decision making processes. They compare Australia’s system of government with another system of government in the Asian region. Students examine Australia’s roles and responsibilities within the international context, such as its involvement with the United Nations. They investigate the features and principles of Australia’s court system, including the role in applying and interpreting Australian law. Students also study the purpose and work of the High Court. Students also examine global connectedness and how this is shaping contemporary Australian society. They investigate the values and practices that enable a democratic society to be sustained.

Backyard Blitz

Students create designed solutions across a range of technologies contexts. Within the context of Agriculture and Horticulture, students are invited to experience learning around the daily management of the AgHort Precinct. Depending on seasonal change, students will be introduced to the growing of vegetables and fruit, both outside and within a controlled greenhouse space. An area of responsibility will be given for classes to maintain a significant area within the College, such as gardens and community spaces. They will also assist in the daily activities in the AgHort area focusing on animal care for our barn chickens and our livestock. A focus study will be introduced where a design task is undertaken.

Coding and Robotics

The practical application of coding and programming in the evolving world of robotics is one of the most quickly developing areas in society. This course will involve students in the development, building and programming of robots in order to solve problems. Robots may be designed with aims to undertake obstacle avoidance, to sense surroundings or to be controlled remotely. Hardware utilised in this course will include the BBC Micro:bit and Arduinos and may include the opportunity to 3D print robotic parts designed by students.

Computer Programming

This unit introduces students to the concepts involved in using a computer programming language. Students will be shown how to methodically develop their problem solving strategies by breaking information problems into manageable parts that can be solved through the writing of a list of logically developed instructions.

The Python programming language will be used to enable students to create computer animations, chatbots, simple computer games and other projects intended to produce information solutions.

Dance

The Dance curriculum aims to develop students’ body awareness and technical and expressive skills through exploration of choreographic and performance skills. In this course, students will develop an understanding of aesthetic, artistic and cultural dance from both the past and contemporary contexts. Students will consider the relationship between dance and other arts forms and the contributions it makes to world cultures and societies.

Digital Media Production

This unit requires students to develop skills in stop motion animation, video production, audio editing and graphics manipulation. Students will be required to use advanced features of editing and encoding software to create finished products in a format suitable for a variety of delivery methods, using software such as Adobe Photoshop, Premiere Pro and After Effects. Students will be required to work collaboratively through online forums when developing solutions and record their processes in a web-based digital folio.

Drama

Students will experiment with, apply a range of exercises, skills and techniques, and seek to refine their own skills in performance. Students will be introduced to concepts of Theatrical Conventions and Stagecraft and will revisit and extend their knowledge of Expressive Skills and Dramatic Elements. They will view drama created by others and analyse their use of these concepts and will work together to create an ensemble performance which allows students to bring these concepts together and apply them in practice.

Enrichment English and Creative Writing

This extension course is designed to allow students to develop and extend their skills in a variety of forms. The analytical study in this course will extend beyond the standard Year 9 English curriculum by providing a focused study through prescribed content, assisting students to enhance their analytical skills and extend the complexity of their written responses. In the creative writing section, students will be challenged with a range of creative writing tasks for different purposes and audiences. Writer’s workshops throughout the course include topics such as: characterisation, plot structures, genre requirements, learning from the work of others, writing to ‘show’ and not ‘tell’ and learning to write effectively at different lengths.

Enrichment Mathematics

The students are introduced to aspects of mathematics that are not currently part of the curriculum to provide stimulating and enriching challenges for the students. This course is an enrichment program designed for students who want to develop a more thorough and extensive background in mathematics. The course includes looking at problem solving techniques and investigations about topics that are relevant to the real world. Students will also complete and present a problem solving activity for the class to complete.

Fitness and Training

The Year 9 Fitness and Training program offers students the opportunity to study the principles related to the science of sport. Fitness and Training will engage students in training methods that will develop individual fitness through practical activities. Students will also develop an understanding of the body systems, nutrition and principles of training that maximise their performance and recovery in a variety of sports and physical endeavours.

Please note: Year 9 Fitness and Training is a precursor for Year 10 Advanced Fitness and Training.

Food Technology Around the World

In this unit, students identify and examine food consumption trends in Australia and compare these with those in other countries. Students obtain an understanding of the major nutritional requirements and use this knowledge to investigate relationships between diet and current health issues. A focus of this subject is to incorporate the elements of design in food preparation. This requires students to follow a design brief to create, produce and evaluate their final food design outcomes. This unit caters for students with interests in the food, entertainment and hospitality industry, whether it is through TAFE courses, apprenticeships, or university degrees in dietetics, new food development and production industry, nutrition agencies or teaching.

Introduction to Metalwork

In this introductory unit, students learn about different metals and their common applications as well as how they differ in terms of welding, shaping, cutting and fabrication. Skill-tasks include forming sheet metal projects using rivet joints and spot welding and fabrication of small projects using mild steel. Students learn about the characteristics of metal using specialist tools such as the magna bend and scroll tool. Students interested in entering a trade, engineering career or TAFE/ VET should consider this unit.

Justice, Money and Markets

The Justice, Money & Markets curriculum explores the ways in which individuals, families, the community, workers, businesses and governments make decisions in relation to the allocation of resources. It enables students to understand the process of economic and business decision-making at the personal, local, national, regional and global levels and the effects of these decisions on themselves and others, now and in the future. Students learn to appreciate the interdependence of decisions made and develop the knowledge, understanding and skills that will inform and encourage them to participate in and contribute to the economy.

Languages: Japanese

The Year 9 Japanese Curriculum enables students to build on their communication skills developed in Year 7 and 8. Students learn to listen to, speak, read and write about a broader range of topics, related to everyday leisure and domestic activities. With preparation, they learn to introduce themselves, talk about identity, daily routines, shopping, health and leisure activities. Students are encouraged to fully develop their hiragana and katakana writing skills. In addition to this, students are introduced to the reading and writing of kanji. Students will also develop an insight into the cultural background of Japan by conducting research and participation in a variety of activities.

Please Note: In order to proceed to the study of Year 10 Japanese, students must successfully complete both Semester units of Japanese in Year 9.

Making a Model in Wood

Students clarify their understanding of design brief requirements and their design ideas. They develop evaluation criteria and use a variety of drawing and modelling techniques to visualise design ideas and concepts. The culmination of this learning enables students to build a range of functional products.

Media Arts

In Media Arts students engage with communications technologies and cross-disciplinary art forms to design, produce, distribute and interact with a range of print, audio, screen-based or hybrid artworks. Students explore, view, analyse and participate in media culture from a range of viewpoints and in a variety of contexts.

Music and Technology: Semester 1

Want to be a D-jay artist? Like music and computers? Then this is the subject for you. In this subject students will focus on technology in music, with particular attention to D-Jay work. Students will monitor their own progression and be encouraged to extend their knowledge by using more advanced skills on their computers. Small group work will require motivation levels and ability levels to be monitored and enhanced when needed.

Music Performance: Semester 2

Want to improve your skills on an instrument? Want to learn an instrument? In this subject students rehearse and perform in ensembles in a variety of styles. Written work is supportive of the instrumental skills and relates directly to what is played on their instrument (this includes voice). Students are recommended to be learning an instrument but students can take the subject if they have a strong, committed desire to learn one.

Textiles

Students clarify their understanding of design brief requirements and their design ideas. They develop evaluation criteria and use a variety of drawing and modeling techniques to visual design ideas and concepts, including pattern interpretation. Students investigate the range of fibres available and the variety of ways in which fibres can be made into fabrics. Using these handmade fabrics, students will then design and construct useable textile items. They will study a variety of ways in which recycling and re-using materials can create textile-based items. Techniques involved in textile art; for example hand and machine sewing, techniques such as tie-dye and stenciling are used to enhance individual projects; fibres including knitting and felting. Students create folios following the design brief principles to document their studies. Students evaluate the level of safety and performance of their productions. They suggest modifications to improve their products in light of performance, function and appearance.

Visual Arts: 2D

With a focus on 2D artwork, students will use a variety of media, materials and technologies drawn from a range of contexts and prepare and present artworks to different audiences. Students will experiment with imaginative and innovative ways of using contemporary and traditional skill, techniques and processes. Students will cover the dimensions of creating and making and exploring and responding. Students will learn and explore a range of art forms. Areas studied in this unit: Visual Art Analysis (Art elements and principles); Drawing; Painting and Printmaking

Visual Arts: 3D

With a focus on 3D artwork students will use a variety of media, materials and technologies drawn from a range of contexts and prepare and present artworks to different audiences. Students will experiment with imaginative and innovative ways of using contemporary and traditional skill, techniques and processes. Students will cover the dimensions of creating and making and exploring and responding. Students will learn and explore a range of art forms. Areas studied in this unit: Visual Art Analysis; Ceramics; Recycled materials and Sculpture

Visual Communication Design

This course will focus on developing skills and confidence in the following areas: technical drawing (using equipment), freehand drawing from observation and rendering surface textures, and creative thinking in a design task with reference to the design elements. A written task analysing existing visual communication examples. Areas studied in this unit: Technical drawing; Free hand drawing and rendering techniques; Problem solving through a design task and Written analysis.

Online Course Selection Process

The following steps outline how to enter your subject preferences online: